Internet Freedom

Online Censorship: Controlled by the Fuzzy Line

by JenniferCobb on 12/01/2011

Online censorship in repressive countries is a complex and often dangerous cat and mouse game, played in the context of a new digital co-dependence.  Most countries, even repressive ones, depend increasingly on the Internet as an engine of economic growth and have a vested interest in building a thriving online space. At the same time, […]

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Real Names in the Networked Global Community

by JenniferCobb on 09/09/2011

At the recent Edinburgh International TV Festival, Andy Carvin of NPR tweeted a question to Eric Schmidt — “How does Google justify its real names only policy on Google+ when it could put some people at grave risk?”  Carvin was referring to places like Libya and Syria where the government routinely uses the Internet as […]

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10 Principles to Govern the Internet

by JenniferCobb on 04/08/2011

The following principles were recently released by the Internet Rights and Principles Coalition, an international coalition of stakeholders participating in the Internet Governance Forum, a group within the United Nations. What do you think? Universality All humans are born free and equal in dignity and rights, which must respected, protected, and fulfilled in the online […]

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The response to Clinton’s Internet Freedom speech has been less than enthusiastic abroad.  Gregory Asmolov, a grad student at GW focusing on social media, recently posted a great overview at Global Voices about the reaction to the speech in the Russian blogosphere.  In sum – it was hardly happy.  The overall tone implies that the […]

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Hillary Clinton, Internet Freedom and Values

by JenniferCobb on 02/16/2011

Hillary Clinton’s speech on Internet Freedom yesterday went a good distance toward addressing some of the most naive responses to the Internet’s role in the unfolding events in the Middle East.  Early sound bites labeling the uprising in Tunisia the “Wikileaks Revolution” or calling Mark Zuckerberg a modern-day “Moses” because of Facebook’s role in Egypt […]

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